The history and development of freehold property title in english system

There were three aspects of feudalism such as personal, property, monarchial control. Under this system, the kings had rights but also had to perform responsibilities under feudalistic societal norms
Over time, it was seen that the monarch was responsible for giving fiefs to knights for military services rendered to him. The king was also responsible for the upkeep of land since he had only parted with possession and not ownership which still vested with the Crown.
Thus it could be seen that in the 10th century, the kings exercised tremendous control and patronage over land, and granted its use as payment for military services rendered by his knights and military personnel.
For the first time in English history, William claimed eventual control of virtually all the land in England and asserted the right to dispose of it as he deemed necessary. Henceforth, all land was owned by the King. At the initial stages, King William appropriated the lands of all English lords who were killed during war and fiefed them to his Norman soldiers and supporters. These initial approbations led to revolts, which resulted in more seizures which moved along unabated for five years after Battle of Hastings.
Even after he managed to quell rebellions, William the Conqueror continued to exercise their domain and supremacy of Normans over the country. His influences was so extensive that if the event an England landlord died without any children, the King or his barons, could choose a heir for the dead man’s properties and successor from Normandy. He exercised control over properties by encouraging marriages to Normans, which resulted in the ultimate takeover of English aristocracy by Normans.
The system enunciated by William has impacted even modern day property holdings in England. The land belongs to the Crown and no individual or private holdings may be enforceable. Even