TellTale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe

The story brings the dark aspect of humankind to the forefront and is a pioneer of books and movies that deal with such criminal psychology. It is a graphic novel that relates how a man kills another man, and yet is convinced that he is not mad. The story opens when an unnamed narrator says that he is not insane, but nervous. He is of the view that the disease afflicting him has made his senses sharper. He talks about an old man who has never harmed him, yet the old man’s blue eye frightens him. The narrator observes the old man closely and one day, he murders him. He cuts the body into pieces and hides them under the floorboards. Soon, he starts hearing sounds coming from the floorboards. The sounds are that of a heart beating and the narrator thinks that it is the old man’s heart. When the police come, the narrator gets scared that they will hear the thumping of the heart. Caught in his vacillating emotions, the narrator panics and admits the crime (Jackson 176).
The dramatized emotions of the narrator are an important indicator of his hypersensitivity. In the opening sentences of the story, the narrator claims to be nervous, not insane. Throughout the story, the narrator tries to justify the rationality of his actions by refuting that he is mad. He considers himself innocent even though he murdered a man, who has never harmed him. The narrator does not kill the man to gain any benefits. He is spurred into action by the blue eye old man. The narrator is indeed mad and the accrual and buildup of emotions of the period of time exceed the tolerance threshold of the narrator, such that he is unable to hide his secret any longer. Bloomfield and Costa assert that the story is as close to a demented soliloquy as one can get and the entrancing, highly theatrical monologue of the narrator presents an accurate picture of the stark egotism of the criminally insane (207).