Psychodynamic Theory and Mood Swings

41000 Psychologically, “a mood swing is an extreme or rapid change in mood. When these changes start to become controlling, mood swings can start to affect the way someone functions.”&nbsp.(Weiner &amp. Freedheim, 2013, p. 352). This implies that mood change reflects sharp and rapid changes to people’s activities and processes. And it changes the way people function and how they do things. Psychoanalysis is the theory through which a researcher examines the way a given individual or groups of people think and provide a thesis that explains the theory or concept that defines the way a person or group thinks (Fayek, 2011). This includes the investigations into the conscious and unconscious nature of the mind in order to draw conclusions about the way a given individual thinks. In order to conduct a basic insight into the matter, there is a need to examine previously generated and presented theories and concepts that are relevant to the study. This will provide a basis for the formulation of a hypothesis and the formulation of important conclusions. Traditionally, mood swings in mainstream psychology have been studied under the banner of bipolar disorders. Bi-polar disorder is “a situation where a person presents a given mood at a particular point in time and then shows another mood in a different point in time due to conditions that are not linked to substance abuse” (Vieta, 2012, p. 4). One of these moods is considered normal, whereas another is either depressive or shows some degree of negative mental thoughts or ideas. Psychoanalysis applies a multidisciplinary approach to deduce the condition of a patient and come up with a solution that can help the patient to overcome his or her mental challenges in bipolar disorders (Fonagy, Mayes, &amp. Target, 2012).