Death and dying

In short, people react differently to death and dying across cultures, age, and mode of manifestation amongst others. This discussion text will discuss the reactions of people to death and dying in two age contexts. between ages 40 years to 60 years, and those above 60 years.
The age between 40 to 60 years is referred to as the midlife in psychology, and is the stage where the people (mid-adults) experience the most challenging events in their lifespan. These might include parenting, divorce, unemployment, and deaths (Ito, 2013). The type of death experienced in this context is the death of a beloved parent, of which most adults respond differently to, as the discussion explains herein. The general reactions, of course varying from person to person, include inability to sleep, difficulty in socializing with others, becoming upset over thinking of the parent, painful memories about the parent, while some even go to the extent of breaking down. In addition to these, others exhibit signs of depression, extensive grief and what can be referred to as somatic responses (Stumpf, 2012). One may experience feelings such as lack of purpose in life, guilt if their relations were not as good, while for some, life seems to pause as they engage in unexplainable self-debates as to why that had to happen.
There are, howevermeant of coping with the negativities that arise from parental death, which deal with each issue in its own context as highlighted below (Angela, Richard, Idan, Devon, &amp. Stefan, 2013):
When one is overly irritable and quite unable to think straight thus paralyzing dialogue or any socialization, they should be left to calm down, cry, or do what fits them best as this helps in releasing the internal tension and feelings. However, if this lingers around for too long, they might require psychiatric assistance.
In most cases, cognitive restoration might