Critique A Streetcar Named Desire

Despite the critical attention that the names in Streetcar have received, two important personal names have gone unglossed, those of the Laurel connections Kiefaber and Shaw, whose testimonies about Blanche’s misdeeds convince Mitch that she is not the woman for him and provoke his fiery attack on her.
Kiefaber is the product of Williams’s inventive imagination. A search through the Laurel, Mississippi, telephone books for the years 1940 through 1947 turned up no Kiefabers, nor did the name appear in the personal name or obituary indexes for the New York Times. The etymology of the name is more revealing.
Kiefaber symbolizes a number of ideas pertinent to Blanche’s predicament in the play. The names second part, Faber, points to the Latin faber "artificer, craftsman who works with solid materials." Faber, of course, is the root of the English word fabricator, a role that the Laurel merchant all-too-happily assumes in Blanche’s view of him as a fabricator of malicious "stories about me." The merchant/craftsman Kiefaber thus joins ranks with another fabricator, Stanley Kowalski–the Stone Age man who is also a blacksmith (Leonard, 1977)–who labors with all kinds of materials to destroy delicate Blanche.
Significantly, too, the merchant is a Kie-fiber, and in context, the prefix might be explained in two appropriate ways. Kie might be seen as an adjective modifying Kiefabers role as a fabricator. he is the key fabricator of the stories that doom Blanche in Mitch’s eyes. After all, Mitch considers the merchant, whose trade is gossip, to be a much more reliable source about Blanche’s scandalous behavior than the supply-man, Shaw, who, according to Stanley, is certain that he had met Blanche in Laurels infamous Hotel Flamingo. Testifying to the merchant’s role as the key contact, Mitch reveals that Stanley also picked up information about Blanche from Kiefaber.&nbsp.&nbsp.