Childrens and Families Social Care

The local authority has the responsibility to facilitate the upbringing of needy children within families by providing a wide range of services to satisfy children’s needs.
There are several principles that strengthen the act and are listed in the third part of the act. First, it is the responsibility of the state through local authorities to promote and safeguard the well-being of vulnerable children (McLeod 29). Secondly, it is in the child’s best interest to be raised in its own families if possible. While it is the parent’s responsibility to bring up children in their families when possible, however, they may need help from state authorities and other family members to do so. In Kyle’s case, her mother had failed in raising her and her family calling for intervention by more responsible members of her family or the relevant state authorities. The idea of partnership is therefore established between the state and families.
To perform these duties within the requirements of the act should be appreciated. Safeguarding has two elements: a duty to avoid impairments and to protect children from ill-treatment. The responsibility to protect children from abuse demands an understanding of the law and the government’s supervision (McLeod 29). On the other hand, safeguarding should not be seen as a different activity from facilitating welfare. In fact, the two are two sides of a coin. Facilitating welfare has positive, wider and an action based perspective that is coupled with the philosophy of providing opportunities that enable children to have the most favorable opportunities in adulthood. Additionally, it ensures that children grow up in a safe environment.