Child Trafficking

This essay stresses that the international legislation considers the use for forced forms of coercion including fraud, abduction, the abuse of power, deception, or a vulnerability position need to be present for crime to rated as trafficking. The united nation protocol of preventing, suppressing, and punishing traffic criminals, especially those who traffic children and women, regard child trafficking as in a human being trafficking. Moreover, the international convention of 182 define child trafficking as a form of child labor.

As the paper declares normally children trafficking debates gravitate against the criminal activity involved and supporting human protection rights. Notably, such debates usually create a false impression of the ideas that are opposing the perspective especially when both sides of arguments are inherently essential and linked to combat and prevent trafficking. Despite the approach given to trafficking problem, it still lacks a single definition of exploitation that influences the act itself. On the other hand, it is as well difficult to determine the point at which the exploitation first begins. There is a close relationship between trafficking and human migration. Therefore, trafficking is not only limited to cross the border but can also be experienced between neighboring states. Human or children trafficking that involves movement of victims cross the borders may be defined as Palermo. Notably, the term also engulfs or applies to both intercontinental and internal trafficking. When people migrate from one place to another at the local, international, or national levels, they usually become vulnerable to trafficking specially during a political crisis or economic crisis or economic pressure. Regardless of their desperate situations that may make them seek for life opportunities, they may consent willingly to be smuggled across a border (Andersen 314). Once across borders, they are likely to be abducted in a trafficking network and become unable to escape since they faced without or limited access to legal protection or advice (Andersen 42). Usually victims of trafficking are never allowed or permitted to leave once they arrive at their destination. They are normally held in custody against their wish and will by force and coercion and forced to certain work or rather provide services to other people or to the traffickers. Such services or work may be bonded or forced including commercial sexual exploitation. However, some traffickers may decide to structure the exploitation to appear as work contract, but with low payment or actually without any form of payment or contract terms that are extensively exploitative. Subsequently, theemployment or the contract structure may be structured to appear as debt bondage where the victim is not allowed or personally able to pay off his or her debts to acquire his or her freedom. Naturally, children are ever trafficked for different purposes including bonded labor, forced labor, and sexual exploitation (Patkar 91). Types of Exploitation Bonded Labor This form of exploitation is also known as debt bondage, which forms the least form known form of labor trafficking that is known in the current world (Andersen 240). However, it is the widely practiced method for enslaving people. In this case, traffic victims are bonded to some labor that is