American Education

Western, Eastern and Native North America have different cultural perspectives, thus, views on education are expected to be diverse. Western education is focused on democracy, individualism, and reason. Its perspectives are rooted deep from the classical schools of thought in philosophy, which progressed from the naturalism to rationalism to individualism. This indicates that Western culture is more focused on the individual rather than the society. Western education and knowledge looks at the world in a more detached manner compared with the Eastern though that man and the universe are part of one big system. Eastern education is influenced more by spirituality and religion. On the other hand, Native American’s education is more focused on re-educating the students in the Western school of thought. The dominating culture of the West has been a primary focus on American’s education, thus, the culture of the natives are discouraged since the dominant culture believes that their education and knowledge is better or more inclined to the truth than the traditional ways of the natives. Though, there have been programs to re-establish the traditional concepts and schools of thought of the native, more inclined to a balance of nature and self (Demmert, 1994).
Another striking difference in the education system of the West and the East is the structure. Eastern education is more teacher-centered, wherein the teacher has the ultimate authority in a classroom setting. Western education, on the other hand, is more student-centered and focus on class participation and interaction. Teacher-centered education gives high expectations and student-centered is more focused on the values that are imparted to its students (LePage and Sockett, 2002). This basically shows that a student-centered setting is more effective in the Western education since it is more focused on individualism and reason. However, the Eastern educational system has learned to strike a balance of these two in order to produce better and more productive students.
Works Cited
Demmert, W. (1994). Blueprints for Indian education: Languages and cultures. ERIC Digest. No: ED372899.
LePage, P. and Sockett, H. (2002). Educational controversies: toward a discourse of reconciliation. NY: Routledge Falmer.