A Rose for Emily by William Faulkners

It has become imperative to take the story in its historical context for the reader to understand the implications and the attitudes of the characters, the townspeople in particular, to Ms Emily Grierson and how it affects the entirety of the plot. The old tradition that encompasses the manner by which the people look at Ms Grierson, sometimes with pity and other times with disdain marks the pull of the interest on which the characters create. It is also impossible not to take the ending as the focal point of the story and quite frankly the main reason for its relentless reputation over the years. The macabre ending gives a lasting impression on the reader and the perceived horror that the story implies.The author delicately induces to the audience the details by which the narrator suggests the events of the story. At one point as Emily went to the drugstore to buy poison, as she claims she would kill rats with, it insinuates that the pharmacist contains much ‘affection’ for her to be objective in the purpose of the arsenic. The man has thought it to be a means for her to commit suicide and thus the entire town thought it to be true. They all waited for the anticipated news of her death but it never came. It is worth analyzing though that there was no secondary explanation sought by the town when it finally came to be that she did not kill herself. The character is much entrenched in the structure of the town to question the events that did not ensue (Curry, par. 2-5).The town does honor her as in her femininity they refuse to point out certain issues. She appears to be present and concurrently absent in the representation. She remains an image that cannot be recapitulated through the narrator. There is in greater sense respect for her secrecy that the women convey to her as they would have required for theirown.